Male Infertility


Infertility is not always a woman's problem. Both women and men can have problems that cause infertility. About one-third of infertility cases are caused by women's problems. Another one third of fertility problems are due to the man.

Specific fertility tests may include:
1. Semen analysis. Your doctor may ask for one or more semen specimens
2. Hormone testing. You may have a blood test to determine your level of testosterone and other male hormones
3. Genetic testing
4. Testicular biopsy
5. Imaging

HORMONES RESPONISABLE
Rarely, infertility results from a hormone deficiency. Luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) cause the testes to produce testosterone and sperm. The pituitary gland, located in the brain, makes these hormones

Causes of male infertility
These may include: Abnormal sperm production or function due to undescended testicles, genetic defects, health problems such as diabetes, or infections such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, mumps or HIV. Enlarged veins in the testes (varicocele) also can affect the quality of sperm.

Signs of Potential Infertility in Men
Changes in hair growth
Changes in sexual desire
Pain, lump, or swelling in the testicles
Problems with erections and ejaculation
Small, firm testicles

COMMON IS INFERTILITY IN MAN
In about 50% of cases, the cause of male infertility cannot be determined. A complete lack of sperm occurs in about 10% to 15% of men who are infertile. A hormone imbalance or blockage of sperm movement can cause a lack of sperm. In some cases of infertility, a man produces less sperm than normal.

MAJOR CAUSE
These may include: Abnormal sperm production or function due to undescended testicles, genetic defects, health problems such as diabetes, or infections such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, mumps or HIV. Enlarged veins in the testes (varicocele) also can affect the quality of sperm.